Garden moodboard: March

Isn’t Spring bloody great?

I’m practically elated to be back to my garden in time for this fabulous early March weather.

As I collected the flowers for these pictures, the sproglet was careening up and down the garden (as full as Spring fever as I am), the air was scented with blossom from next door’s tree and I could hear the chirruping of birds, the drone of bumble bees and the low ribbits of the frogs in the pond.

If that sounds too ridiculously bucolic for words, that’s pretty much how I felt as well.

March garden moodboard
Yellows, blues and whites just shout spring, don’t they?

We haven’t got a huge amount of flowers out there. Three months of building work has put paid to many of the beds closest to the house. But some bulbs have struck through regardless and there are buds on all the bushes and trees promising a feast of glorious things to come later.

Of course, I couldn’t find much to photograph these against, in among all the building detritus, so these are shown on a piece of beige plyboard. Classy, eh?

They may be slim pickings and they may be inadequately backdropped, but these lovely first signs of spring still make me smile…

Acer bud | Wolves in London
The promise of great things to come

Our acer tree has fabulous red stems and little furled buds that look as if they’ll be coming into leaf within a week or so.

Crocus | Wolves in London
Small but impressive

These purple and white crocuses have fought through against all the odds, a little cluster peeking out in the front garden, pushing their way through (quite literally) inches of dust, rubble and sawdust. I just love a garden survivor…

Daffodil | Wolves in London
It’s as good as feeling the sun on your face, looking at a cheery yellow daff

There are small little outbreakings of daffodils around the garden, though the couple of large pots with bulbs in are doing best. I think this might be something like a Narcissus ‘Tete a Tete’ as it’s quite short and riotously yellow (and obviously happy growing in pots with complete and utter neglect…)

Grape hyacinth | Wolves in London
Have I ever mentioned before (ahem) that I love blue flowers the most?

As I’m sure I’ve said a million times before, I just adore blue flowers. These lovely grape hyacinths are just poking their noses above the soil in a couple of places. I hope to be getting more as the month progresses…

Primula | Wolves in London
Another stalwart, unbothered by neglect, trampling or dust…

The good old Primula is another survivor. Not the most exciting plant in the world, in my opinion, but reliable and cheery.

Magnolia | Wolves in London
Oh the delicate papery magnolia!

And very much saving the best til last, my lovely magnolia flowers that grow over the front garden from the tree next door and which I claim as my own each year…

Spring. It’s really good to see you after what’s felt like a long and rather difficult Winter. Please stick around.

(And, just in case that all sounds a bit too good to be true, here’s the behind the scenes peek. We spent all of last weekend moving a huge pile of rubble into bags and then to the tip, so the “patio” outside the kitchen is now clear. But, ahem, as you can see, it needs a bit of love and attention still:)

Flowers on concrete
This looks bleak, I know, but trust me when I say this is major progress!

Joining in with Karin A.

Related articles:

  • I’m coming round to almost a whole year of garden moodboards now, take a look at them all if you’re so inclined: Garden moodboards.
  • My Pinterest board collects together some of my favourite moodboards each month, both from my blog and from others. Follow along there for lots of monthly garden loveliness…
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One thought on “Garden moodboard: March

  1. I feel exactly the same way about spring. We planted a riot of crocuses and mini daffodils across the verge outside a couple of years ago. It really makes me smile. I hope it brings a smile to others too.
    Love your chipboard backdrop. Looks great close up!

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